Growing up in the 1960s-70s, I was exposed to comic strips in the typical way, I saw the discarded funny pages on the burn pile by the fireplace. I was lured by their distinctive art styles and the bright, rich colors that embellished them in the Sunday newspapers. On that day, every week, I would sprint from my home the 5 blocks to our neighborhood market to buy a copy of the San Francisco Chronicle so that I could follow and marvel at my most favorite comic strip, Chester Gould’s Dick Tracy.

It didn’t take long for me to realize that this was what I wanted to do with my life: create and draw my own comic strip! I started right away, I didn’t wait to grow up first. I turned the family’s living room into my studio. I used the low and inapt coffee table as my drawing board. I worked with what I could get my hands on, a pad of sketch paper, color pencils and a ruler. I created my own version of Dick Tracy: a detective a little more James Bondish whose name was Peterson White. If I remember right, I produced 3 and a half Sunday-length strips on my first pass of the effort. I remember not being totally satisfied with it, I re-did those strips... and feeling the same way with those I re-did them again, a third time. I don’t think I ever felt completely satisfied with my work. In the end, Peterson White never got to solve his first case and bring the international master criminal gang to justice.

My life’s ambition took a course change when at about the age of 14 I discovered comic books—oh man... comic books! Comic books were cool! Marvel Comics! Doctor Strange contesting with Eternity over the destruction of the Earth; Thor confronting Ego, the Living Planet; Dracula traveling to America via a fighter jet; those incredible artists, Gene Colan, John Buscema, Jim Starlin, Jack Kirby, Steve Ditko (to name a few)... this is what I wanted to do with my life: draw Captain America comic books, or The Silver Surfer, or Doctor Strange... whatever Stan Lee would throw my way.

Being a comic book artist stayed at the top of my list for a long time—I’m skipping now a lot of years, a lot of details... you’re welcome—but I never managed to break into that industry. Instead, I became a graphic designer. It was good work. It was fun, but that was all... it was not my heart’s choice.

Amongst it all—meeting and marrying a most wonderful girl, graphic designing, taking trips to far away places now and then—I worked on developing a story that I wanted to make into a series of graphic novels. I stayed that course for years, until one Christmas my lady gave me a book: the 7th volume of The Complete Dick Tracy, by IDW Publishing. Bam! There I was again, reading, enjoying, studying, scrutinizing, absorbing my most favorite comic strip! The book also provided background on the man himself, Chester Gould: how he got started, how he plotted his stories, where he got his ideas, and how every week of his professional life was a never-ending race with the deadline! The cartoonist’s path is certainly not the most glamorous one out there, you take it up prepare to engage in the swinging lifestyle of a hermit. There it is.

I put myself back on my original course heading by deciding to turn my series of graphic novels into a comic strip! This was around 2013, and my situation at the time was most convenient—I was jobless. Realizing the level of work that laid ahead of me, I knew the time was perfect, that it wouldn’t ever get better than this! If I didn’t do it now, while I still had a shirt on my back, I would never have another chance.

So began The Orphanauts! I worked up a month’s worth of dailies plus a Sunday strip, wrote an outline, character briefs, and sent submissions to four major syndicates. I got back two responses—both rejections, but one rejection letter was not the standard form! This one editor took the time to write me and say that she really liked my strip... and the reasons why! She said even though it was not a “good fit” for her firm, she encouraged me to keep going with it and wished me luck! It was not a sell, but it was the next best thing!

I gave up on syndication and the newspapers and decided the best way to go was to get with the times (not in the Times)... the internet is a wide open public square, room always for one more website, one more webcomic! ...Don’t really like the term “webcomic,” I prefer to call it a comic strip.

So here it is... The Orphanauts: an online and ongoing dramatic science-fiction adventure comic strip. We are here for the long fun haul. I hope you will stay with these toddlers to see if they make it in the end! Enjoy!  —CS

See NEWS & UPDATES for the latest skinny on the website and the comic strip!

Subscribe

Payment of one low fee will give you access to a complete story (365 comic strips, as soon as they are published). The first 92 strips are free for viewing.

Consider supporting the creator… this might be your new favorite comic strip!

Click here to Subscribe

CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.
The Story Behind the Strip

Growing up in the 1960s-70s, I was exposed to comic strips in the typical way, I saw the discarded funny pages on the burn pile by the fireplace. I was lured by their distinctive art styles and the bright, rich colors that embellished them in the Sunday newspapers. On that day, every week, I would sprint from my home the 5 blocks to our neighborhood market to buy a copy of the San Francisco Chronicle so that I could follow and marvel at my most favorite comic strip, Chester Gould’s Dick Tracy.

It didn’t take long for me to realize that this was what I wanted to do with my life: create and draw my own comic strip! I started right away, I didn’t wait to grow up first. I turned the family’s living room into my studio. I used the low and inapt coffee table as my drawing board. I worked with what I could get my hands on, a pad of sketch paper, color pencils and a ruler. I created my own version of Dick Tracy: a detective a little more James Bondish whose name was Peterson White. If I remember right, I produced 3 and a half Sunday-length strips on my first pass of the effort. I remember not being totally satisfied with it, I re-did those strips... and feeling the same way with those I re-did them again, a third time. I don’t think I ever felt completely satisfied with my work. In the end, Peterson White never got to solve his first case and bring the international master criminal gang to justice.

My life’s ambition took a course change when at about the age of 14 I discovered comic books—oh man... comic books! Comic books were cool! Marvel Comics! Doctor Strange contesting with Eternity over the destruction of the Earth; Thor confronting Ego, the Living Planet; Dracula traveling to America via a fighter jet; those incredible artists, Gene Colan, John Buscema, Jim Starlin, Jack Kirby, Steve Ditko (to name a few)... this is what I wanted to do with my life: draw Captain America comic books, or The Silver Surfer, or Doctor Strange... whatever Stan Lee would throw my way.

Being a comic book artist stayed at the top of my list for a long time—I’m skipping now a lot of years, a lot of details... you’re welcome—but I never managed to break into that industry. Instead, I became a graphic designer. It was good work. It was fun, but that was all... it was not my heart’s choice.

Amongst it all—meeting and marrying a most wonderful girl, graphic designing, taking trips to far away places now and then—I worked on developing a story that I wanted to make into a series of graphic novels. I stayed that course for years, until one Christmas my lady gave me a book: the 7th volume of The Complete Dick Tracy, by IDW Publishing. Bam! There I was again, reading, enjoying, studying, scrutinizing, absorbing my most favorite comic strip! The book also provided background on the man himself, Chester Gould: how he got started, how he plotted his stories, where he got his ideas, and how every week of his professional life was a never-ending race with the deadline! The cartoonist’s path is certainly not the most glamorous one out there, you take it up prepare to engage in the swinging lifestyle of a hermit. There it is.

I put myself back on my original course heading by deciding to turn my series of graphic novels into a comic strip! This was around 2013, and my situation at the time was most convenient—I was jobless. Realizing the level of work that laid ahead of me, I knew the time was perfect, that it wouldn’t ever get better than this! If I didn’t do it now, while I still had a shirt on my back, I would never have another chance.

So began The Orphanauts! I worked up a month’s worth of dailies plus a Sunday strip, wrote an outline, character briefs, and sent submissions to four major syndicates. I got back two responses—both rejections, but one rejection letter was not the standard form! This one editor took the time to write me and say that she really liked my strip... and the reasons why! She said even though it was not a “good fit” for her firm, she encouraged me to keep going with it and wished me luck! It was not a sell, but it was the next best thing!

I gave up on syndication and the newspapers and decided the best way to go was to get with the times (not in the Times)... the internet is a wide open public square, room always for one more website, one more webcomic! ...Don’t really like the term “webcomic,” I prefer to call it a comic strip.

So here it is... The Orphanauts: an online and ongoing dramatic science-fiction adventure comic strip. We are here for the long fun haul. I hope you will stay with these toddlers to see if they make it in the end! Enjoy!  —CS

See NEWS & UPDATES for the latest skinny on the website and the comic strip!

The Story Behind the Strip

Growing up in the 1960s-70s, I was exposed to comic strips in the typical way, I saw the discarded funny pages on the burn pile by the fireplace. I was lured by their distinctive art styles and the bright, rich colors that embellished them in the Sunday newspapers. On that day, every week, I would sprint from my home the 5 blocks to our neighborhood market to buy a copy of the San Francisco Chronicle so that I could follow and marvel at my most favorite comic strip, Chester Gould’s Dick Tracy.

It didn’t take long for me to realize that this was what I wanted to do with my life: create and draw my own comic strip! I started right away, I didn’t wait to grow up first. I turned the family’s living room into my studio. I used the low and inapt coffee table as my drawing board. I worked with what I could get my hands on, a pad of sketch paper, color pencils and a ruler. I created my own version of Dick Tracy: a detective a little more James Bondish whose name was Peterson White. If I remember right, I produced 3 and a half Sunday-length strips on my first pass of the effort. I remember not being totally satisfied with it, I re-did those strips... and feeling the same way with those I re-did them again, a third time. I don’t think I ever felt completely satisfied with my work. In the end, Peterson White never got to solve his first case and bring the international master criminal gang to justice.

My life’s ambition took a course change when at about the age of 14 I discovered comic books—oh man... comic books! Comic books were cool! Marvel Comics! Doctor Strange contesting with Eternity over the destruction of the Earth; Thor confronting Ego, the Living Planet; Dracula traveling to America via a fighter jet; those incredible artists, Gene Colan, John Buscema, Jim Starlin, Jack Kirby, Steve Ditko (to name a few)... this is what I wanted to do with my life: draw Captain America comic books, or The Silver Surfer, or Doctor Strange... whatever Stan Lee would throw my way.

Being a comic book artist stayed at the top of my list for a long time—I’m skipping now a lot of years, a lot of details... you’re welcome—but I never managed to break into that industry. Instead, I became a graphic designer. It was good work. It was fun, but that was all... it was not my heart’s choice.

Amongst it all—meeting and marrying a most wonderful girl, graphic designing, taking trips to far away places now and then—I worked on developing a story that I wanted to make into a series of graphic novels. I stayed that course for years, until one Christmas my lady gave me a book: the 7th volume of The Complete Dick Tracy, by IDW Publishing. Bam! There I was again, reading, enjoying, studying, scrutinizing, absorbing my most favorite comic strip! The book also provided background on the man himself, Chester Gould: how he got started, how he plotted his stories, where he got his ideas, and how every week of his professional life was a never-ending race with the deadline! The cartoonist’s path is certainly not the most glamorous one out there, you take it up prepare to engage in the swinging lifestyle of a hermit. There it is.

I put myself back on my original course heading by deciding to turn my series of graphic novels into a comic strip! This was around 2013, and my situation at the time was most convenient—I was jobless. Realizing the level of work that laid ahead of me, I knew the time was perfect, that it wouldn’t ever get better than this! If I didn’t do it now, while I still had a shirt on my back, I would never have another chance.

So began The Orphanauts! I worked up a month’s worth of dailies plus a Sunday strip, wrote an outline, character briefs, and sent submissions to four major syndicates. I got back two responses—both rejections, but one rejection letter was not the standard form! This one editor took the time to write me and say that she really liked my strip... and the reasons why! She said even though it was not a “good fit” for her firm, she encouraged me to keep going with it and wished me luck! It was not a sell, but it was the next best thing!

I gave up on syndication and the newspapers and decided the best way to go was to get with the times (not in the Times)... the internet is a wide open public square, room always for one more website, one more webcomic! ...Don’t really like the term “webcomic,” I prefer to call it a comic strip.

So here it is... The Orphanauts: an online and ongoing dramatic science-fiction adventure comic strip. We are here for the long fun haul. I hope you will stay with these toddlers to see if they make it in the end! Enjoy!  —CS

See NEWS & UPDATES for the latest skinny on the website and the comic strip!

X
TRIPLE-LENGTH strip #127 posts in:
CLOCK RUNNING
See NEWS & UPDATES for details
.